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Mobile Apps User Experience and Customer Experience – Are they different? | Prismetric

Mobile Apps User Experience and Customer Experience – Are they different?

At first glance, both user experience and customer experience of a mobile app seem to be identical.

Our Users = Our Customers; so are they speaking about the same thing?

Unless, of course, they are not. So, how are mobile UX and CX different?

Most designers focus on the UX aspect of the mobile app. However, they should also take into consideration the broader context of CX to build a successful application.

UX and CX for Apps

What is User Experience?

User Experience is how a user feels when he or she interacts with an app. The results of the user experience for an app can be measured to some extent – level of customer support enquiries that followed into an interaction, satisfaction reports, time it takes for a user to take an action on the mobile app, etc. UX is typically a product or service centric.

What is Customer Experience?

Customer experience is a much broader concept. It is defined as the experience that a customer (or user) has when they interact with a company or brand. In its true sense, UX is a subset of CX in broader terms. Thus, if you sum up each user experience with your mobile application, you would get your customer experience. Unfortunately, it does not work that way. There are several factors that affect the mobile application customer experience, and thus, it should be taken into consideration while designing your app.

The UX and CX Difference

The difference between user experience and customer experience can be made more distinct by listing some aspects of each of them:

UX is the user/customer’s experience with a mobile application – the design interface, information architecture, usability, comprehension, visual hierarchy, navigation, etc. All these elements combine to deliver user experience, whether it is positive or negative.

On the other hand, customer experience encompasses all products and all channels pertaining to a brand or company, and how your customers feel about them. Therefore, it includes everything that connects a customer to a brand or business – product delivery, customer service, brand image, pricing, advertising, sales process, etc.

Ideally, the UX should be designed such that it adds to the CX, and thus enhancing branding in the process. These are the traits of experienced professionals perfecting the art of mobile app development.

Below are examples that will clearly outline the difference between UX and CX.

Good UX and Bad CX
Suppose you want to book air tickets and have downloaded an app from a leading airline company that lets you browse tickets and book online. You have never used an app before to book air tickets, but the application’s easy-to-understand interface, fast loading time, and clear navigation features helped you search and book your tickets in less than 10 minutes. (UX)

Once you visit the airport, you find a completely different story. The queue is unnecessarily long, the check-in counter lack staff, and the attendant is unfriendly. On the flight, services were poor. (CX)

This is a perfect example of good mobile app UX and poor CX.

Bad UX and Good CX

Take another example – you have downloaded an app that lets you edit photos on your mobile device. You have heard good reviews about the app but when you actually started using it, you find it complex with poor navigation and a confusing interface. You were unable to find or use the feature you wanted. (UX)

Thankfully, you came across their help line number. When you call, a friendly customer care representative answers all your queries. Everything is good now, it seems. Additionally, they gave you $15 credit for the inconvenience caused. (CX)

This is a perfect example of bad UX and good CX.